Favorite Reads for Children

100 Children’s Books to Read in a Lifetime

This is a wonderful list of children’s books that we know you will enjoy reading with your little one.  The votes are in, and Goodreads readers have selected the following list of 100 books.

100 Children’s Books to Read in a Lifetime

THIS BOOK JUST ATE MY DOG! BY RICHARD BYRNE

As Bella takes her dog for a walk across the pages, he disappears into the crack (the gutter) down the middle of the book.   As others come along to offer her some assistance, they also disappear in the same way.  The reader is then called upon to save the day by shaking and wiggling and shaking the book some more to let everybody out. The story ends with a cute note to the reader to tell the book not to be so naughty next time.

Reviewed by Michelle Zimostrad, Hoyt Library

Recommended for ages 3-6

THE IRON TRIAL BY HOLLY BLACK & CASSANDRA CLARE

“FIRE wants to BURN.  WATER wants to FLOW.  AIR wants to RISE.  EARTH wants to BIND.  CHAOS wants to DEVOUR.”  Warned about the dangers of magic his whole life by his father, Callum Hunt does everything possible to fail the Iron Trial so he doesn’t have to attend the Magisterium, a school to teach youth with magical talents.  Callum is utterly confounded when Master Rufus chooses him as an apprentice despite having the lowest score.  Is magic really as evil as his father would have him believe?  The first in a new series by two bestselling authors ends with a delightful twist leaving readers filled with questions and begging for next title.

Reviewed by Jennie Tuttle, Wickes Library

Recommended for grades 4-7

Thomas Jefferson: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Everything by Maira Kalman

This biographical picture book introduces elementary age readers to one of America’s most beloved figures.  More than just a president, Jefferson held many and varied interests from gardening, to art and music.  The book outlines his interests and accomplishments without glossing over the fact that he was also a flawed man.  A perfect introduction to one of our greatest presidents appropriate for young readers and a great book for reading aloud.

Reviewed by Kim White, Hoyt Library

Recommended for ages 6 – 10

Stories to Scare Your Socks Off As Recommended by School Library Journal

For Younger Readers

 

Dinosaur Thunder by Marion Dane Bauer (for preschool – grade 1)

What If…? by Anthony Browne       (for preschool – grade 2)

When Lions Roar by Robie H. Harris                  (for preschool – grade 2)

Some Things Are Scary by Florence Parry Heide          (for preschool – grade 2)

Black Dog by Levi Pinfold      (for preschool – grade 3)

Creepy Carrots by Aaron Reynolds (for preschool – grade 2)

Bedtime Monsters by Josh Sneider   (for preschool – 1)

The Dark by Lemony Snickett (for preschool – grade 2)

 

For Middle Grade Readers

 

The Mostly True Story of Jack by Kathy Barnhill        (for grades 4 – 7)

Doll Bones by Holly Black      (for grades 4 – 8)

Infestation by Timothy Bradley                  (for grades 5 – 8)

Coraline by Neil Gaiman                   (for grades 3 – 6)

A Tale Dark and Grimm by Adam Gidwitz                   (for grades 4 – 7)

Professor Gargoyle by Charles Gilman      (for grades 4 – 7)

The Orphan of Awkward Falls by Keith Graves (for grades 4 – 7)

Raven’s Gate by Anthony Horowitz           (for grades 5 – 8)

Home Sweet Horror by James Preller                  (for grades 3 – 5)

Literally . . . → Read More: Stories to Scare Your Socks Off As Recommended by School Library Journal

Stubby the War Dog: The True Story of World War I’s Bravest Dog by Ann Bausum

Stubby was a stray Boston bull terrier who became the mascot for the Army’s 102nd Infantry division.  His Master, J Robert Conroy, smuggled him to the front lines of battle in WWI France. This is the story of how Stubby helped the soldiers in the trenches by warning of gas attacks and sniffing out the enemy.  Wounded in battle, he later cheered injured soldiers in the Army hospitals and assisted in finding wounded soldiers on the battlefield. Once, Stubby even captured a German soldier!  A true story of one of America’s bravest dogs, filled with period photographs and artifacts, Stubby the War Dog is sure to delight fans of history and animal-lovers alike.

Reviewed by Kim White, Hoyt Library.

Recommended for grades 5 and up.

THE DAY I LOST MY SUPERPOWERS BY MICHAËL ESCOFFIER

“The day I discovered I could fly, I knew that I was special.”  So begins a tale of a young superheroine and the development of her superhuman strengths.  With each one she discovers, a variety of exhilarating achievements and troubling setbacks occur. All of it leads the masked hero to wonder “if my parents could tell – if they knew about my superpowers.” The answer is revealed one day when her powers short-circuit, and Mom must step in to save the day.  While the sparse text relates the girl’s impressions, the masterfully simple illustrations reveal a more ordinary reality.  Pair this title with Ladybug Girl by Jacky Davis and David Soman for a storytime of every day superheroes.

Reviewed by Jennie Tuttle, Wickes Library.

Recommended for preschool – 3rd grade.

How to Lose a Lemur by Frann Preston Gannon

Everyone knows that once a lemur takes a liking to you, there isn’t much you can do about it.  So when a lemur starts following the young boy in this story, he knows there isn’t much he can do about it, but he tries anyway.

He tries ignoring the lemur, hiding in a tall tree, riding his bike as fast as he can to get away, but that doesn’t work, AND the lemur is joined by his lemur friends—so now the boy has a whole passel of lemurs following him around.  He tries being upfront and honest and telling them to leave, but alas that doesn’t work either.

The boy had no choice but to continue trying to get away—he bought a ticket on a fast train, drifted across a lake in a boat, took to the skies in a hot air balloon, traveled across a scorching desert, climbed the highest mountain in a blizzard—but all that running got the boy was lost.  And alone.  But as he looked around, he started to see some familiar faces who guided him back home, realizing that lemurs aren’t so bad after all, and maybe they could be friends, because as everyone knows. . . . → Read More: How to Lose a Lemur by Frann Preston Gannon

Searching for Sarah Rector: The Richest Black Girl in America by Tonya Bolden

Coretta Scott King award winner Tonya Bolden investigates the story of Sarah Rector, a Cherokee freedman’s daughter, who became the richest girl in America due to the discovery of oil on land she owned as part of the land allotment she received in the breaking up of the Oklahoma Indian Territories.  Sarah’s wealth put her in great danger from those who would profit off her land. Newspapers reported that Miss Rector was missing and may have been done in for her fortune. Those stories set off an alarm leading to the search for Sarah Rector.

Bolden uses primary source materials to investigate what really happened to Sarah Rector and shows that a little bit of investigative research can help you solve history’s mysteries.

Reviewed by Kim White, Hoyt Library.

Recommended for grades 5 – 8.

 

DOG VS. CAT BY CHRIS GALL

One day, Mr. and Mrs. Button visit animal shelters to pick out a pet—unfortunately, they visit different shelters.  Mr. Button brings home a friendly-looking dog, while Mrs. Button brings home a smart-looking cat.  Since they live in a rather small house, Dog and Cat must share a room.

Dog and Cat do NOT get along.  They are TOTAL opposites.  Dog is sloppy while Cat is a neat freak.  Dog likes to keep in constant touch with all his friends and Cat likes to play games all night long.  And then, there was the litter box issue, which started a battle of epic proportions—each trying to get the upper hand over the other—that resulted in separation and time out for both, which did give them time to think about how much each missed the other one.   Upon release from their confinement, Dog and Cat find themselves united in trying to deal with the new TERRIFYING creature Mr. and Mrs. Button brought home.

Reviewed by Kathy Thornhill, Zauel Memorial Library.

Recommended for preschool-2nd grade.